Beyerdynamic TG-X 10, gebr.

Artikelnummer: 64051919

Kategorie: Mikrofone


€ 119,00

Gebrauchtware - Verkauf nach §25a UStG., zzgl. Versand

sofort verfügbar

Lieferzeit: 2 - 3 Werktage



Beschreibung

Beyerdynamic TG-X 10, gebr.




 

eatures

The MCE 90 is a compact, sturdy-looking mic roughly the same size as a Neumann TLM 103 or an AKG C3000. A large slot, which runs all the way around the belly of the mic, locks it into the supplied shock-mount basket. Underneath the mic are a pair of recessed switches. One switch engages a 15 dB pad and the other kicks in a low-cut filter that slopes off below 100 Hz. This low-cut switch also engages a 3 dB lift affecting frequencies above about 2 kHz.

I've seen the MCE 90 mistakenly touted in certain catalogs as being a large-diaphragm condenser mic - it really has more of a midsize diagram (roughly 5/8"). After polling a number of engineers and manufacturers it seems that 3/4" is considered the border between mid and large. One person polled even called 5/8" a small diaphragm.

The MCE 90 is also an electret design, with a permanently charged backplate. Historically, this has been a less-expensive way to build a capsule. Though electrets used to be found primarily in very cheap (and often bad-sounding) mics, the technology has come a long way - electrets are now capable of turning in excellent sound. For example, the Audio Technica 4033 and Shure KSM 32 (both midsize electrets like the MCE 90) are great-sounding, versatile microphone - See more at: http://www.prosoundnetwork.com/article/beyerdynamic-mce-90-studio-condenser-mic/617#sthash.MECrtusN.dpuf
eatures

The MCE 90 is a compact, sturdy-looking mic roughly the same size as a Neumann TLM 103 or an AKG C3000. A large slot, which runs all the way around the belly of the mic, locks it into the supplied shock-mount basket. Underneath the mic are a pair of recessed switches. One switch engages a 15 dB pad and the other kicks in a low-cut filter that slopes off below 100 Hz. This low-cut switch also engages a 3 dB lift affecting frequencies above about 2 kHz.

I've seen the MCE 90 mistakenly touted in certain catalogs as being a large-diaphragm condenser mic - it really has more of a midsize diagram (roughly 5/8"). After polling a number of engineers and manufacturers it seems that 3/4" is considered the border between mid and large. One person polled even called 5/8" a small diaphragm.

The MCE 90 is also an electret design, with a permanently charged backplate. Historically, this has been a less-expensive way to build a capsule. Though electrets used to be found primarily in very cheap (and often bad-sounding) mics, the technology has come a long way - electrets are now capable of turning in excellent sound. For example, the Audio Technica 4033 and Shure KSM 32 (both midsize electrets like the MCE 90) are great-sounding, versatile microphone - See more at: http://www.prosoundnetwork.com/article/beyerdynamic-mce-90-studio-condenser-mic/617#sthash.MECrtusN.dpuf
eatures

The MCE 90 is a compact, sturdy-looking mic roughly the same size as a Neumann TLM 103 or an AKG C3000. A large slot, which runs all the way around the belly of the mic, locks it into the supplied shock-mount basket. Underneath the mic are a pair of recessed switches. One switch engages a 15 dB pad and the other kicks in a low-cut filter that slopes off below 100 Hz. This low-cut switch also engages a 3 dB lift affecting frequencies above about 2 kHz.

I've seen the MCE 90 mistakenly touted in certain catalogs as being a large-diaphragm condenser mic - it really has more of a midsize diagram (roughly 5/8"). After polling a number of engineers and manufacturers it seems that 3/4" is considered the border between mid and large. One person polled even called 5/8" a small diaphragm.

The MCE 90 is also an electret design, with a permanently charged backplate. Historically, this has been a less-expensive way to build a capsule. Though electrets used to be found primarily in very cheap (and often bad-sounding) mics, the technology has come a long way - electrets are now capable of turning in excellent sound. For example, the Audio Technica 4033 and Shure KSM 32 (both midsize electrets like the MCE 90) are great-sounding, versatile microphone - See more at: http://www.prosoundnetwork.com/article/beyerdynamic-mce-90-studio-condenser-mic/617#sthash.MECrtusN.dpuf
eatures

The MCE 90 is a compact, sturdy-looking mic roughly the same size as a Neumann TLM 103 or an AKG C3000. A large slot, which runs all the way around the belly of the mic, locks it into the supplied shock-mount basket. Underneath the mic are a pair of recessed switches. One switch engages a 15 dB pad and the other kicks in a low-cut filter that slopes off below 100 Hz. This low-cut switch also engages a 3 dB lift affecting frequencies above about 2 kHz.

I've seen the MCE 90 mistakenly touted in certain catalogs as being a large-diaphragm condenser mic - it really has more of a midsize diagram (roughly 5/8"). After polling a number of engineers and manufacturers it seems that 3/4" is considered the border between mid and large. One person polled even called 5/8" a small diaphragm.

The MCE 90 is also an electret design, with a permanently charged backplate. Historically, this has been a less-expensive way to build a capsule. Though electrets used to be found primarily in very cheap (and often bad-sounding) mics, the technology has come a long way - electrets are now capable of turning in excellent sound. For example, the Audio Technica 4033 and Shure KSM 32 (both midsize electrets like the MCE 90) are great-sounding, versatile microphone - See more at: http://www.prosoundnetwork.com/article/beyerdynamic-mce-90-studio-condenser-mic/617#sthash.MECrtusN.dpuf
eatures

The MCE 90 is a compact, sturdy-looking mic roughly the same size as a Neumann TLM 103 or an AKG C3000. A large slot, which runs all the way around the belly of the mic, locks it into the supplied shock-mount basket. Underneath the mic are a pair of recessed switches. One switch engages a 15 dB pad and the other kicks in a low-cut filter that slopes off below 100 Hz. This low-cut switch also engages a 3 dB lift affecting frequencies above about 2 kHz.

I've seen the MCE 90 mistakenly touted in certain catalogs as being a large-diaphragm condenser mic - it really has more of a midsize diagram (roughly 5/8"). After polling a number of engineers and manufacturers it seems that 3/4" is considered the border between mid and large. One person polled even called 5/8" a small diaphragm.

The MCE 90 is also an electret design, with a permanently charged backplate. Historically, this has been a less-expensive way to build a capsule. Though electrets used to be found primarily in very cheap (and often bad-sounding) mics, the technology has come a long way - electrets are now capable of turning in excellent sound. For example, the Audio Technica 4033 and Shure KSM 32 (both midsize electrets like the MCE 90) are great-sounding, versatile microphone - See more at: http://www.prosoundnetwork.com/article/beyerdynamic-mce-90-studio-condenser-mic/617#sthash.MECrtusN.dpuf
eatures

The MCE 90 is a compact, sturdy-looking mic roughly the same size as a Neumann TLM 103 or an AKG C3000. A large slot, which runs all the way around the belly of the mic, locks it into the supplied shock-mount basket. Underneath the mic are a pair of recessed switches. One switch engages a 15 dB pad and the other kicks in a low-cut filter that slopes off below 100 Hz. This low-cut switch also engages a 3 dB lift affecting frequencies above about 2 kHz.

I've seen the MCE 90 mistakenly touted in certain catalogs as being a large-diaphragm condenser mic - it really has more of a midsize diagram (roughly 5/8"). After polling a number of engineers and manufacturers it seems that 3/4" is considered the border between mid and large. One person polled even called 5/8" a small diaphragm.

The MCE 90 is also an electret design, with a permanently charged backplate. Historically, this has been a less-expensive way to build a capsule. Though electrets used to be found primarily in very cheap (and often bad-sounding) mics, the technology has come a long way - electrets are now capable of turning in excellent sound. For example, the Audio Technica 4033 and Shure KSM 32 (both midsize electrets like the MCE 90) are great-sounding, versatile microphone - See more at: http://www.prosoundnetwork.com/article/beyerdynamic-mce-90-studio-condenser-mic/617#sthash.MECrtusN.dpuf
eatures

The MCE 90 is a compact, sturdy-looking mic roughly the same size as a Neumann TLM 103 or an AKG C3000. A large slot, which runs all the way around the belly of the mic, locks it into the supplied shock-mount basket. Underneath the mic are a pair of recessed switches. One switch engages a 15 dB pad and the other kicks in a low-cut filter that slopes off below 100 Hz. This low-cut switch also engages a 3 dB lift affecting frequencies above about 2 kHz.

I've seen the MCE 90 mistakenly touted in certain catalogs as being a large-diaphragm condenser mic - it really has more of a midsize diagram (roughly 5/8"). After polling a number of engineers and manufacturers it seems that 3/4" is considered the border between mid and large. One person polled even called 5/8" a small diaphragm.

The MCE 90 is also an electret design, with a permanently charged backplate. Historically, this has been a less-expensive way to build a capsule. Though electrets used to be found primarily in very cheap (and often bad-sounding) mics, the technology has come a long way - electrets are now capable of turning in excellent sound. For example, the Audio Technica 4033 and Shure KSM 32 (both midsize electrets like the MCE 90) are great-sounding, versatile microphone - See more at: http://www.prosoundnetwork.com/article/beyerdynamic-mce-90-studio-condenser-mic/617#sthash.MECrtusN.dpuf
 

Versandgewicht: 5,00 Kg